Simple Angel Wings to Make http://vintageinfo.net/easy-angel-wings-to-make/

Simple Angel Wings – Easy To Make from Crepe Paper

Simple Angel Wings to Make http://vintageinfo.net/easy-angel-wings-to-make/
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These easy-to-make Angel Wings are great for school plays, Halloween costumes, even dress-up.
They could also be used as butterfly wings, fairy wings, bug wings.

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Material

  • Verybest Crepe, 1 fold No. 100 White;
  • 1 pc. No. 7 Flower Wire;
  • paste;
  • 1 pc. 1/2" white Gift tyying Ribbon.

Easy Angel Wings to Make http://vintageinfo.net/easy-angel-wings-to-makeWrap two 18" pieces of wire with 1/2"  wide strips of crepe paper.  (see Tips for Cutting Crepe Paper)

Cut crepe paper 19" wide, 24" long.

Paste one wrapped wire to each 19" edge. Fold edge over 1/2" and paste, arranging so that the paper extends 1/2"  beyond the wire at both ends.

Fold in 1/2" accordion pleats. Fasten at middle with thread, Fig. F. While still in tight
pleats, cut ends in semicircle, Fig. F. Cover center fastening with a narrow wrapping of crepe paper.

Sew ribbons to center in crossed position so that they may be brought over shoulders, under arms, crossed in front and tied at back.

Bend wires at center so that wings will open into correct position.

Would you like to make fancier wings? Then check out: How to Make Feather-Like Angel Wings.

Feather-Like Angel Wings http://vintageinfo.net/downloads/angel-wings-costume-of-crepe-paper/


Make Feather Like Angel Wings http://vintageinfo.net/how-to-make-angel-wings/

How to Make Feather-Like Angel Wings

Make Feather Like Angel Wings http://vintageinfo.net/how-to-make-angel-wings/

  • Making Feather Wings

    Feather wings, such as Cupid wings and angel wings, are made on a founda­tion of wire bent in the correct shape, or if they are quite large, the foundation is made of cardboard reinforced with wire. When cardboard is used, cut inthe desired shape and then cut out the center, leaving a narrow frame. A wire, shaped to follow the outline of the wing, is fastened to it with tabs of gummed cloth tape (illus. No.1). After the wires are attached, cover the frame smoothly on both sides with crepe paper.

    make-feather-wings"Feathers" made of rows of pointed petals are pasted to the foundation. The wings are made separately, each one having an extension that bends back and fastens to the other. The wings are sewed to the back of the costume. Large wings, in addition to being sewed, are often tied with narrow ribbons across the chest.

Get the FULL instructions to make these feather-like Angel Wings & the Angel Costume

2 - PDF files, instant download.

Feather-Like Angel Wings & Costume Using Crepe Paper (16 pages)

Crepe Paper Costumes 101: Basic Tips for Making Crepe Paper Costumes (28 pages)

Angel Wings & Costume Instructions http://vintageinfo.net/downloads/angel-wings-costume-of-crepe-paper/

Are you looking for simpler wings to make?  Check out: Simple Angel Wings

Brickwork Afghan Pattern

brickwork-afghan2

Making this Brickwork Pattern Afghan is a great way to use up fabric scraps.  Alternately, I really like the suggestion made to use special fabrics - suits, dresses...etc. This could make a very nice memento for someone.

For a practical, inexpensive, and pretty afghan we recommend this patchwork afghan in a brickwork pattern. It is an excellent way of preserving the material of treasured dresses, suits, coats, and ties. The afghan may be made from silk and rayon pieces, or, for greater warmth, make it of wool pieces and line with outing flannel in a medium or dark shade.

If the, afghan is made according to the directions given it will measure about 56 by 76 inches. The chart shows a suggested color scheme in which rose, blue, green, yellow, and violet silks were used. All blocks in a given color need not be from the same material; that is, in the afghan shown, part of the rose blocks were cut from a rose satin sash, part from a rose and white print, and still others from a rose crepe dress, but the general effect was the same. In woolens,grays, blacks, browns, tans, wines,blues, and greens, with a few gay colors will make a pretty afghan.

To cut the blocks make patterns from stiff paper or cardboard. The brick block is a rectangle 4 1/2 by 8 1/2 inches. This allows for 1/4-inch seams. For heavy woolens make the block about 5 by 9 inches, thus allowing for 1/2-inch seams. Cut a 4 1/2-inch square for the half-blocks (a 5-inch square for half-block if using woolens). Using these for patterns, cut blocks from your materials, cutting blocks on the straight thread of the goods. No set color scheme need be followed so we are not suggesting the number of blocks to be cut from each color. You may have each row a different color if you choose, or you may repeat the same color in several rows. It will be most economical to make the longest rows, or the rows you repeat most often, of the color of which you have the most blocks.

To assemble the pieced center lay pieces as shown on the chart, beginning at upper right-hand corner with the block marked R1. Continue to lay 10 more blocks of this same color across diagonally to lower left edge, following the arrangement in the row marked R1. As explained before, these blocks need not be rose but may be any other color you choose, though they should all be of the same general color.

Choose another color which looks well beside the color of this row. Beginning just below the block in upper right corner, lay a diagonal row of 11 blocks, following the arrangement of blocks in the row marked B2. Continue to lay diagonal rows as shown on the chart; then fill in the upper left-hand corner as shown by the chart. Fill ends of alternate rows with half-blocks to complete the row. Shift rows if necessary until the color harmony is a pleasing one.

Piecing: work may be done by hand or on the machine. Silks you may wish to join by hand; with woolens the machine is preferable. Beginning at right upper corner with block R1, pin it to block BELOW (B2), and that to the block BELOW, and so on to the lower right corner. There will be 8 whole Blocks in the row. Seam blocks together, press seams open, lay strip back in place. Pin and join the next strip. When all 11 strips have been joined and pressed, seam strips together lengthwise; press seams open.

Border: for our silk afghan we were fortunate, by piecing the strips, to have enough black satin from a discarded dress and robe to cut the border. For the side borders cut 2 strips 6 1/2 inches wide, and as long as the afghan plus 13 inches. For the end borders cut 2 strips 6 1/2 inches  wide, and as long as the width of the afghan plus 13 inches. Seam strips to center, mitering corners. We like outing flannel for the lining for it is both soft and warm. For the silk afghan put a thin layer of cotton batting over lining (this is optional with the wool afghan), pin afghan top in place. Put in frames and quilt, quilting around each block of center, and quilting border as illustrated or in your favorite pattern. The border is most effective if quilted with lustrous thread (pearl cotton) in a contrasting color. We used rose on the black. Bind edge with satin blanket binding in the same shade.

Once the method of making the center is understood you will find many uses for this brickwork pattern. Using smaller blocks it makes attractive quilt and pillow tops, and is a good way of using scraps of material without following a set color scheme.

brickwork-afghan-chart2

Double Nine-Patch Knitted Rag Rug Pattern (1940’s)

rag-rug-nine-patch1

Rag rugs! My family had several of them - they were in virtually every room of the house and boy did they stand the test of time!  My Mom just recently donated several of them to a local thrift shop - none of them were as fancy as this "Nine-Patch" one.  Enjoy making it!

This rug is knitted of rags sewed hit-or-miss, the arrangement of the blocks giving the nine-patch effect.

Cut wool, cotton, or rayon materials into strips about 1/2 to 1 inch wide depending on the weight of the material. Overlap ends of strips, fold edges together, and sew ends of strips together. Sew hit-or-miss fashion, alternating dark with light strips, and bright with dull colors. Wind into balls. Choose two colors of which you have large amounts for the border and sew these into separate balls, having about 1 pound of each. Distribute the remainder of these colors through-out the sewing.

Use a pair of No. 8 plastic needles and knit closely. Decide upon the width you wish to make the rug. Allow about 8 inches for border (4 inches on each side). Divide the remainder of the width by 3 (3 blocks wide) to determine the size of the blocks, which are squares. The rug will be 5 blocks long plus the 8-inch allowance for border.

Cast on a number of sts to equal the measurement desired for block. Work back and forth in garter st (knit every row slipping the first st of each row) until block is a perfect square; bind off. Make 15 such blocks. Arrange blocks as shown in illustration. In the first row have the knit rows running from side to side in the blocks at corners. Place the center block of this row with the knit rows running up and down. In the next row have the knit rows running up and down in the blocks at the edge and crosswise in the center block. Arrange the 3rd row like the first row, 4th row like the 2nd row, and 5th row like the first row. Pin blocks together to form lengthwise strips. Using 2 strands of heavy thread, sew the blocks together with over and over stitches; sew strips together.

Border: use a wooden or steel crochet hook large enough to carry the material. Attach lighter border color at one corner of rug, ch 1, work 2 sc in corner; work a row of sc around entire rug working 3 sc in corners. Keep the blocks even by Working the same number of sc along each block; sc in corner at beginning of rnd with first 2 sc, si st in first sc of rnd. Rnd2: ch 1, 2 sc in same sc with si st, 1  sc in each sc of previous rnd, working 3 sc in middle sc of 3-sc at corners; work last sc in same place with first 2  sc of rnd, si st in first sc of rnd. Work 1 more rnd like Rnd 2; fasten off. Attach darker color in st with last si st, work 4 rnds with dark color like Rnd 2; fasten off after si st. Press rug on wrong side with a damp cloth.

 

Rose Flower Doily Pattern

This Rose Flower Doily may be made with any of the American Thread Company products listed below:

Material
Quantity
Doily Size (Approximate)

Size of Needle
"GEM" Crochet Cotton
Article 35, Size 30
1 Ball White
1 Ball Light Pink
1 Ball Dark Pink
1 Ball Nile Green
9 Inches
Steel 12
******************* *******************
OR"STAR" Tatting Cotton
Article 25
2 Balls White
2 Balls Light Pink
1 Ball Dark Pink
1 Ball Nile Green
7 "
" 13
*******************  *******************
OR"STAR" Crochet Cotton
Article 20, Size 30
1 Ball White
1 Ball Light Pink
1 Ball Dark Pink
1 Ball Nile Green
9 "
" 12
*******************
*******************
OR"STAR" Crochet Cotton
Article 30, Size 30
2 Balls White
2 Balls Light Pink
1 Ball Dark Pink
1 Ball Nile Green
9 "
" 12

ROSE FLOWER—With Dark Pink ch 5, join to form a ring, ch 6, d c in ring, * ch 3, d c in ring, repeat from * twice, ch 3, join in 3rd st of ch.
2nd Row—1 s c, 5 d c, 1 s c over each ch 3 loop, join.
3rd Row—* Ch 5, s c between next 2 petals in back of work, repeat from * 4 times.
4th Row—Ch 1 and over each loop work 1 s c, 7 d c, 1 s c, join.
5th Row—* Ch 6, s c in back of work between next 2 petals, repeat from * 4 times.
6th Row—Ch 1 and over each loop work 1 s c, 9 d c, 1 s c, join, break thread.
7th Row—Attach Green in same space, * ch 7, s c in 2nd st from hook, 1 s d c in each of the next 2 sts of ch (s d c: thread over hook, insert in st, pull through, thread over and pull through all loops at one time), 1 d c in each of the next 3 sts of ch, s c in same space between petals, ch 6, s c in back of work between next 2 petals, repeat from * all around (5 leaves) ch 6, join.
8th Row—Work 5 s c up side of next leaf, 3 s c in point of leaf, 5 s c down other side of same leaf, 8 s c over next ch 6 loop, repeat from beginning 4 times, break thread.
9th RowStart Petal: Attach Light Pink in 1st s c of the 8 s c group between leaves, ch 3, d c in same space, 1 d c in each of the next 2 s c, 2 d c in each of the next 2 s c, 1 d c in each of the next 2 s c, 2 d c in next s c, ch 3, turn.
10th Row—2 d c in same space, 1 d c in each of the next 10 d c, 3 d c in 3rd st of ch, ch 3, turn.
11th Row—Working in d c, increase 1 d c at each end and in each of the 2 center sts, ch 3 to turn each row (20 d c).
12th Row—Increase 1 d c at beginning and end of row (22 d c).
13th Row—Same as 11th row having 26 d c in row.
14th Row—Same as 12th row (28 d c).
15th Row—Increase 1 d c at each end and increase 1 d c in each of the 2 center sts (32 d c).
16th Row—Work even.
17th Row—Increase 1 d c at beginning and end of row. Repeat the last 2 rows once, then work 2 rows even.
22nd Row—Decrease in next 2 sts (to decrease: * thread over hook, insert in next st, pull through and work off 2 loops, repeat from * once, thread over and pull through all loops at one time), 1 d c in each of the next 31 d c, decrease in next 2 sts.
23rd Row—Decrease 1 d c at beginning and end of row, ch 1, turn.
24th Row—Skip 1 d c, s c in next d c, 1 s d c in each of the next 2 d c, 1 d c in each of the next 6 d c, 1 tr c in each of the next 12 d c, 1 d c in each of the next 6 d c, 1 s d c in each of the next 2 d c, s c in next st, break thread.
Attach thread in 1st s c of next s c group of 8th row and work another petal in same manner, break thread. Work 3 more petals same as last petal, break thread. Attach Dark Pink at base of any petal and work a row of s c around each petal working 3 s c in top of each corner of petal, break thread.
Sew petals together from the 9th through the 16th row as illustrated.
LEAF: With Green ch 19, sl st in 2nd st from hook, 1 s c in each of the next 2 sts of ch, 1 s d c in each of the next 2 sts, 1 d c in each of the next 2 sts of ch, 1 tr c in each of the next 4 sts of ch, 1 d c in each of the next 2 sts, 1 s d c in each of the next 2 sts, 1 s c in each of the next 2 sts, 1 sl st in last st of ch, ch 1 and working on other side of ch, sl st in next st, 1 s c in each of the next 2 sts, 1 s d c in each of the next 2 sts, 1 d c in each of the next 2 sts, 1 tr c in each of the next 4 sts, 1 d c in each of the next 2 sts, 1 s d c in each of the next 2 sts, 1 s c in each of the next 2 sts, 1 sl st in next st.
2nd Row—Ch 1, 1 s c in each of the next 2 sts, 1 s d c in each of the next 3 sts, 1 d c in each of the next 8 sts, 1 s d c in each of the next 2 sts, 1 s c in each of the next 2 sts, 1 sl st in next st, ch 1, 1 s c in each of the next 2 sts, 1 s d c in each of the next 2 sts, 1 d c in each of the next 8 sts, 1 s d c in each of the next 2 sts, 1 s c in each of the next 2 sts, sl st in each of the next 2 sts, break thread leaving an end. Work 4 more leaves in same manner and sew in space between petals picking up back loop of sts only and sewing to the widest part of leaf.
RUFFLE—Attach White in center of any petal, * ch 4, skip 1 st, s c in next st, repeat from * to within 3 sts of joining, skip 1 st, d c in next st keeping last loop of d c on hook, skip 1 st of same petal and 1 st on side of next leaf, d c in next st keeping last loop of d c on hook, thread over and pull through all 3 loops at one time, * ch 4, skip 1 st, s c in next st, repeat from * around leaf to within 3 sts of joining on left hand side of leaf, skip 1 st, d c in next st keeping last loop of d c on hook, skip 1 st on leaf and 1 st on side of next petal, d c in next st keeping last loop of d c on hook, thread over and pull through all loops at one time, * ch 4, skip 1 st of petal, s c in next st, repeat from * all around in same manner working be­tween joinings same as on 1st leaf.
2nd Row—Sl st into loop, ch 6, s c in same loop, * ch 6, s c in next loop, ch 6, s c in next loop, ch 6, s c in same loop, repeat from * all around ending row with ch 3, d c in sl st (this brings thread in position for next row).
3rd Row—* Ch 6, s c in next loop, repeat from * all around ending row with ch 3, d c in d c. Work 6 more rows same as last row, but ending last row with ch 6, s c in d c and having an even number of loops in last row, break thread.
10th Row—Attach Dark Pink in any loop, ** ch 4, cluster st in next loop (cluster st: thread over hook, insert in space, pull through and work off 2 loops, * thread over hook, insert in same space, pull through and work off 2 loops, repeat from * once, thread over and pull through all loops at one time), ch 5, sl st in 3rd st from hook for picot, ch 2, cluster st in same loop, ch 4, s c in next loop, repeat from ** all around, ch 4, join, break thread.

How To Make Tin Foil Animals

Another nifty craft from the 1930's that uses an ordinary item  to make something creative.

Thirty years ago, as a child, Paul E. Tichon began collecting scraps of tin foil. He still does. In the meantime, every scrap he could lay his hands on he has converted into hundreds of delicately and-wrought pieces of “sculpture,” some of which are illustrated on these pages.

Zebras, strange birds, dogs, deer, gayly bedecked knights in shining armor astride well-modeled horses, and dozens of other creatures line shelves in his Akron, Ohio, home, while one of his most prized creations is a framed three-dimensional picture in tin-foil relief showing a wintry woodland scene with fawns grazing in the foreground.

A lifelong fondness for studying animals and a natural artistic aptitude combined to give Tichon his remarkable skill in modeling. Unlike sculptors who use tools, he forms his figures entirely by pressing the metal foil into desired shapes with his lingers. Metal foil has certain advantages other modeling mediums lack, according to Tichon. It is yielding enough to be pressed into shape, yet it does not spring out of shape when pressure is removed. And, as it crinkles under pressure, it becomes stronger just as corrugated metal is stronger than sheet metal.

A capable artist familiar with painting in oils, Tichon quite naturally tried combining his two talents. The result was more than satisfactory. Now he hand-paints his zebras, for example, in true-to-life colors and patterns which, as he jokingly puts it, enable people to distinguish his zebras from his jackasses. Paint solved another perplexing problem for him-the obtaining of lifelike faces. Details of eyes, nostrils, and other features applied with artists’ oil colors did the trick.

Tichon’s animals are usually made of only two or three pieces of foil which he first cuts to approximate sizes. They are pressed, modeled, bent, and folded to form the figures, then crimped together. So agile are his 'fingers that he can model a deer in less than five minutes. He has trained himself so thoroughly that he can make from memory in a surprisingly short time a realistic tin-foil figure of almost any species of bird or beast you can mention to him.

 

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