Pioneer Silhouette Shadow Pattern

Click on the image above to get a larger size

The Pioneer man and woman look weary from traveling across the prairie.  She is in a long dress and bonnet.  He is carrying his rifle while wearing a cowboy hat.

This silhouette pattern is great for making unique yard art, using in scrap booking, making a stamp or any of a number of uses!

Use graph paper to enlarge the pattern.  Click on the Pioneer Silhouette image to get a larger size.

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Pony Express Silhouette Shadow Pattern

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This cowboy on horseback is part of the Pony Express.  Use the entire silhouette as it is or with slight modification you could make it into just a cowboy on horseback.

Use this shadow pattern to create unique yard art, for scrap booking, stamp making or any of a number of projects.

Click on the image to get a larger version of it.  Use graph paper to adjust the size of the image.

You might also like these nifty Cowboy Shadow Patterns

Cowboy Shooting Gun Shadow Pattern

Click on the image above to get a larger version of it.

This cowboy is in the middle of a shoot-out.  He looks like he is hiding behind a trunk of treasure with a jug o' whiskey sitting in front of it.  Poised and ready to defend his loot, he is aimed directly at the outlaws disturbing the town.

This cowboy shadow pattern / silhouette pattern has many uses.  You can make it into yard art using your jig saw/scroll saw, use it for scrap booking, create a card, make a stamp....etc.

Click on the image to get a larger version of it.  Use graph paper to adjust the size of the image.

You might also like these nifty Cowboy Shadow Patterns

How To Make a Backyard Ice Scating Rink

Once the ground is well frozen and there is plenty of snow you have perfect conditions for making a back yard ice skating rink.

Find a nice stretch of flat ground and begin planning your very own ice rink.

Making your own ice skating rink doesn't take much skill. What it does take is some patience to wait for everything to freeze. It may take a couple of days for your ice skating rink to be ready for skating.

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How to Build a Garbage Can Shed

Q. I want to build a "barrel shed" for a garbage can. Our section is heavily infested with rats so wood is not practical. Could I pour concrete in an outer and inner form to take care of the sides, floor and roof at the same time? Any other suggestions would be appreciated.—H. S., New Bedford, Mass.

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Built-in Mail Box Provided in Wall(1945’s)

wall_mail_box

To get the full plans and directions for building these Wall Mail Box CLICK HERE

IF YOU are away from home during the day or you go away on short trips for several days at a time, it is advisable to install a built-in mail box to assure the safety of your mail. For the deposit of mail the wall compartment has a slot in the outside of the house, and for the withdrawal of mail it has a door on the inside wall. The convenience of the built-in mail box will be appreciated at all times, but in cold weather it will be especially welcome.

To provide this convenience, first buy an outside mail box plate and decide on the location for the plate. From 40" to 42" is a good height. Then choose a spot that you know is between two wall studs. Frame houses of single-siding construction show where the studs are, as the nails used to secure the siding are driven into the studs. If the house is of double construction these nails are no indication of the stud locations. It may be possible to check on the location to see if it is clear of studs by working on the inside wall. A series of small holes drilled through the plaster directly above the baseboard will determine if a stud is likely to interfere. Start cutting through the lath and plaster from the inside. This method is advisable, because you may have missed the stud location, and it would be much easier to rectify a mistake on the inside wall than on the outside. Mark the opening on the inside wall about 20" high. This area should be located so the outside slot will come near the top. Knock away all plaster in this area and cut out the lath. In-stall 2x4 headers at top and bottom of the area. The top one keeps out dust; the bottom one catches the mail at the level of the door.

To cover the opening, cut a piece of 1/4" plywood to size. Make an opening for the door and apply a frame around this opening as shown. Bevel strips of lath and nail them to one side of the plywood panel. Install the panel over the opening. Now you can plaster the panel in the usual way, building it up to the surface of the surrounding wall. The plaster, being well keyed into the beveled lath, will be permanent. Paint or wallpaper can be applied to match the rest of the wall.

To get the full plans and directions for building these Wall Mail Box CLICK HERE

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